Bugs


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What's a "bug" to you?

 

Bugs
 
 

Every bug is an insect...

          but not every insect is a bug!

 

   

Is it something that bothers you?    
      "Don't bug me!"
 
Or is it when someone acts crazy?    
      "You`re buggy!"
 
Is it the flu?  
      "Ker-chew-w-w-w! I caught a bug."
 
Or is it when your computer doesn't work? 
      "This software has bugs!"
 
Well, to some people, "bugs" are all the little creepy-crawly things that scare people just by being around. True "bugs" are a type of insect.

Insects  have three main parts to their body — a head, thorax, and abdomen, six legs, one pair of antennae, and usually two pairs of wings.
  
A true "bug" is a type of insect called Hemiptera (pronounced "he-MIP-ter-a" meaning "half wing") that have a mouthpart that usually comes out of the tip of their head that is used for piercing and sucking.

True bugs are often not welcome visitors in a home or garden.
 
Many things we call bugs are not ACTUALLY bugs.
For example, spiders are not bugs because they have no sucking mouth part. They are not even an insect because they have eight legs and only two body parts!
 
 
Do insects "bug" you?
 
Before you squish that little guy,
THINK TWICE... he may be a friend!
 
If you have ever been stung by a bee, buzzed by a pesky mosquito or had the leaves of your favorite plant eaten by a hungry caterpillar, you have probably wondered...what good are insects, anyway? 
 
Yes.... it is true that insects can cause damage, but they they can also be very helpful.
 

 
DID YOU KNOW?

Discoveries of insect fossils show us that insects have been around for at least 350 million years.

There are over 3 million species of insects, and more are being discovered every day.

The female of most insect species is usually larger than the male.

Scientists are guessing that over 200 million insects live in the soil of one acre of rich farmland.


To lean more...A Place to Go
for More to Know

The Houghton-Mifflin website
explains the importance of insects.